Art

THE SHIP OF TOLERANCE

The Mission

Wilstar is focused on building a syndicate to help finance of the construction of the ship of tolerance in 2018. The Ship of Tolerance is the vision of Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, world-renowned artists who have toured this installation in many cities around the world. The mission of the Ship of Tolerance is to build long term friendships and understanding as well as educating and connecting youth from different continents, cultures and identities living in our society, through the language of art and music. It is a conceptual piece which examines how divergent cultures interpret tolerance. The project brings together Norwegian, multicultural and asylum seeking children from the wider Oslo area. The ships sails are stitched together from paintings by hundreds of these local school children and it will convey a message of tolerance and hope. By participating in the creation of this ship, children will learn about respecting different cultures and ideas while appreciating how they differ from their own. In addition they hold a concert with talented child musicians from several countries around the world and refugee communities from the host country.

THE ARTISTS

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov are globally recognized as the premier artists to emerge from the Soviet Union and major figures on the international art scene. In 2008 they were awarded the Praemium Imperiale, established by the Emperor of Japan to honor the fields that the Nobel Prize does not cover. “Art News” magazine named them among top 10 living artists.

Their work is regularly exhibited in leading international museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Centre George Pompidou, Paris, State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. In 1993 they represented Russia at the 45th Venice Biennale with their installation The Red Pavilion. The Kabakovs have also completed many important public commissions throughout Europe and have received a number of honors and awards, including the Oscar Kokoschka Preis, Vienna, in 2002 and the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, Paris, in 1995.

llya Kabakov has been making installation art since 1984. Working with Emilia Kabakov, he has become one of the medium’s most important practitioners and theoreticians. He is a leading figure of the Russian art movement of the 1980s


The Project

The project begins with an outreach to schoolchildren ages 6 to 13 to discuss the meaning of tolerance and the merits of other cultures, races, and ideas. For three weeks they work with local teaching artists to expand their own cultural, creative, and academic horizons. These lessons will be taught with a combination of Save the Children and Nobel Peace Centre involvement. At the end of the workshop period, children will draw paintings, some of which will become part of the installation. Skur 13 at Filipstad near Aker Brygge will be the main painting area for one week in June 2017

Children will view the ship’s construction — and meet the young carpenter apprentices from Manchester, England who will be building the boat. Selected paintings created by the children will form a giant sail, hoisted atop the just constructed ship. We will also invite 6 local young apprentices from challenged backgrounds to help with the construction and learn the skills of carpentry. The entire process will take 3-4 weeks, and during that time, hundreds of visitors will come by daily to view the construction, learn about the project, and be inspired by its message.

The ship’s launch is the project’s climax. Beautifully lit, the ship creates an atmosphere of joy and celebration for participants, including children, supporters, friends, local community leaders and the general public.

Key to the success of this endeavour is social engagement on multiple platforms, across institutions and schools and public events where the issues can be debated. The central focus of the venture would be the ship and the events which are coordinated around it. But, just as important are the conversations we can organize surrounding the main event, in public spaces, where intolerant attitudes can be challenged in new and less confrontational ways.


Partners

In order to make the venture a success we have built a network of support and Wilstar foundation would work together with local cultural groups, NGOs and social entrepreneurs to make the installation as effective and impactful as possible.

Save the Children, have pledged to support the project with their logistics, volunteers and their wide network, to enhance the impact of the message.

National Geographic Magazine are structuring a photo workshop around the event, for youngsters who will be taught by National Geographic photographers, on the issue of tolerance in their society.

We will also partner with the Nobel Peace Centre who have agreed to host the ship in front of their building with a foot fall of 80,000 people per day in the summer months. We are also hoping to partner with several Norwegian institutions and cultural leaders, who advocate tolerance at the core of their values, with this in mind, we will be approaching various cultural institutions in Oslo.




Previous Installations

The Ship of Tolerance successfully first launched in Siwa, Egypt in 2005 and was then
created in Venice, Italy; San Moritz, Switzerland; Sharjah, UAE; Miami and NYC, USA; and Havana, Cuba and Moscow in early September 2016. This project was awarded the prestigious Cartier Prize for the best art project of the year in 2010. In New York, instructors led workshops for hundreds of students, ages 5 through 13, in public schools throughout the five boroughs. More than 500 children made paintings expressing their interpretations of tolerance. An additional 100 paintings were created in drawing sessions in city parks on Staten Island and Brooklyn hosted by The Noble Maritime Collection. A selection of 150 student paintings were sewn together to create the sail for The Ship of Tolerance. The remaining paintings were on display throughout the city.




National Geographic Photo Camp

Wilstar is proud to partner with National Geographic Photo Camp, the Norwegian Red Cross and the Nobel Peace Centre along with several National Geographic photographers including Wilstar’s own Marcus Bleasdale and to offer a series of three Photo Camp workshops for both refugee and Norwegian youth in Bergen, Trondheim and Oslo in the summer and fall of 2017. Our mission for the Norwegian Photo Camps is to build friendships and understanding and to educate and connect youth from different continents and cultures living in our society through photography.

Since 2003, National Geographic Photo Camp has provided programs for more than 2,000 young people in more than 75 locations, from refugee settlements in Uganda and Jordan, to Native American reservations in Taos, New Mexico and inner city neighbourhoods in Havana, Cuba and New York. This will be the first time the National Geographic Photo Camps have come to Europe. The students will work on their project over 4-5 months before the National Geographic team arrives in August. The final presentation of student photographs will be projected in all three cities on the final night of the Photo Camp at locations including the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo.

The Project will also cooperate with the Norwegian Red Cross and the Refugee Buddy program funded by the H&M Foundation in Norway. Refugee Buddy is a three-year project with the aim of starting activities in all of the 19 Red Cross districts. It aims to contribute to the integration and inclusion of unaccompanied minors, young refugees and asylum seekers by enabling them to build social networks through interaction with Norwegian youth.

The Nobel Peace Centre hopes to produce an exhibition combining work of National Geographic photographers with the work created by students during the Photo Camps. The mission of National Geographic Photo Camp is to inspire young people to tell their own stories through photography thereby providing a youth perspective of our society to a wide audience. This project is an opportunity not only to empower youth and to encourage tolerance and understanding, but also to share these students’ stories and give the youth of today a voice.

The Mission

Wilstar is focused on building a syndicate to help finance of the construction of the ship of tolerance in 2018. The Ship of Tolerance is the vision of Ilya and Emilia Kabakov, world-renowned artists who have toured this installation in many cities around the world. The mission of the Ship of Tolerance is to build long term friendships and understanding as well as educating and connecting youth from different continents, cultures and identities living in our society, through the language of art and music. It is a conceptual piece which examines how divergent cultures interpret tolerance. The project brings together Norwegian, multicultural and asylum seeking children from the wider Oslo area. The ships sails are stitched together from paintings by hundreds of these local school children and it will convey a message of tolerance and hope. By participating in the creation of this ship, children will learn about respecting different cultures and ideas while appreciating how they differ from their own. In addition they hold a concert with talented child musicians from several countries around the world and refugee communities from the host country.

The Artists

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov are globally recognized as the premier artists to emerge from the Soviet Union and major figures on the international art scene. In 2008 they were awarded the Praemium Imperiale, established by the Emperor of Japan to honor the fields that the Nobel Prize does not cover. “Art News” magazine named them among top 10 living artists.

Their work is regularly exhibited in leading international museums, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Centre George Pompidou, Paris, State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. In 1993 they represented Russia at the 45th Venice Biennale with their installation The Red Pavilion. The Kabakovs have also completed many important public commissions throughout Europe and have received a number of honors and awards, including the Oscar Kokoschka Preis, Vienna, in 2002 and the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, Paris, in 1995.

llya Kabakov has been making installation art since 1984. Working with Emilia Kabakov, he has become one of the medium’s most important practitioners and theoreticians. He is a leading figure of the Russian art movement of the 1980s

The Project

The project begins with an outreach to schoolchildren ages 6 to 13 to discuss the meaning of tolerance and the merits of other cultures, races, and ideas. For three weeks they work with local teaching artists to expand their own cultural, creative, and academic horizons. These lessons will be taught with a combination of Save the Children and Nobel Peace Centre involvement. At the end of the workshop period, children will draw paintings, some of which will become part of the installation. Skur 13 in Aker Brugge will be the main painting area for one week in June 2017

Children will view the ship’s construction — and meet the young carpenter apprentices from Manchester, England who will be building the boat. Selected paintings created by the children will form a giant sail, hoisted atop the just constructed ship. We will also invite 6 local young apprentices from challenged backgrounds to help with the construction and learn the skills of carpentry. The entire process will take 3-4 weeks, and during that time, hundreds of visitors will come by daily to view the construction, learn about the project, and be inspired by its message.

The ship’s launch is the project’s climax. Beautifully lit, the ship creates an atmosphere of joy and celebration for participants, including children, supporters, friends, local community leaders and the general public.

Key to the success of this endeavour is social engagement on multiple platforms, across institutions and schools and public events where the issues can be debated. The central focus of the venture would be the ship and the events which are coordinated around it. But, just as important are the conversations we can organize surrounding the main event, in public spaces, where intolerant attitudes can be challenged in new and less confrontational ways.

Partners

In order to make the venture a success we have built a network of support and Wilstar foundation would work together with local cultural groups, NGOs and social entrepreneurs to make the installation as effective and impactful as possible.

Save the Children, have pledged to support the project with their logistics, volunteers and their wide network, to enhance the impact of the message.

National Geographic Magazine are structuring a photo workshop around the event, for youngsters who will be taught by National Geographic photographers, on the issue of tolerance in their society.

We will also partner with the Nobel Peace Centre who have agreed to host the ship in front of their building with a foot fall of 80,000 people per day in the summer months. We are also hoping to partner with several Norwegian institutions and cultural leaders, who advocate tolerance at the core of their values, with this in mind, we will be approaching various cultural institutions in Oslo.



Previous Installations

The Ship of Tolerance successfully first launched in Siwa, Egypt in 2005 and was then created in Venice, Italy; San Moritz, Switzerland; Sharjah, UAE; Miami and NYC, USA; and Havana, Cuba and Moscow in early September 2016. This project was awarded the prestigious Cartier Prize for the best art project of the year in 2010. In New York, instructors led workshops for hundreds of students, ages 5 through 13, in public schools throughout the five boroughs. More than 500 children made paintings expressing their interpretations of tolerance. An additional 100 paintings were created in drawing sessions in city parks on Staten Island and Brooklyn hosted by The Noble Maritime Collection. A selection of 150 student paintings were sewn together to create the sail for The Ship of Tolerance. The remaining paintings were on display throughout the city.



National Geographic Photo Camp

Wilstar is proud to partner with National Geographic Photo Camp, the Norwegian Red Cross and the Nobel Peace Centre along with several National Geographic photographers including Wilstar’s own Marcus Bleasdale and to offer a series of three Photo Camp workshops for both refugee and Norwegian youth in Bergen, Trondheim and Oslo in the summer and fall of 2017. Our mission for the Norwegian Photo Camps is to build friendships and understanding and to educate and connect youth from different continents and cultures living in our society through photography.

Since 2003, National Geographic Photo Camp has provided programs for more than 2,000 young people in more than 75 locations, from refugee settlements in Uganda and Jordan, to Native American reservations in Taos, New Mexico and inner city neighbourhoods in Havana, Cuba and New York. This will be the first time the National Geographic Photo Camps have come to Europe. The students will work on their project over 4-5 months before the National Geographic team arrives in August. The final presentation of student photographs will be projected in all three cities on the final night of the Photo Camp at locations including the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo.

The Project will also cooperate with the Norwegian Red Cross and the Refugee Buddy program funded by the H&M Foundation in Norway. Refugee Buddy is a three-year project with the aim of starting activities in all of the 19 Red Cross districts. It aims to contribute to the integration and inclusion of unaccompanied minors, young refugees and asylum seekers by enabling them to build social networks through interaction with Norwegian youth.

The Nobel Peace Centre hopes to produce an exhibition combining work of National Geographic photographers with the work created by students during the Photo Camps. The mission of National Geographic Photo Camp is to inspire young people to tell their own stories through photography thereby providing a youth perspective of our society to a wide audience. This project is an opportunity not only to empower youth and to encourage tolerance and understanding, but also to share these students’ stories and give the youth of today a voice.

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